Survival rates indicate what percentage of persons with lung cancer of the same age and stage are still alive after being diagnosed for a given period of time. The survival rate indicated cannot be used to predict how long a patient will survive, but it can assist the patient in determining whether or not the treatment will be successful. This is helpful in estimating the life expectancy of people with lung cancer.

What does it mean to have a five-year survival rate?

The percentage of persons who live for five years after being diagnosed with cancer is known as the five-year survival rate. For example, a 90 percent 5-year survival rate suggests that 90 people out of 100 will live for five years after being diagnosed with cancer.

Non-small cell lung cancer five-year survival rates are provided below per stage:

Stage 1

People with stage 1A NSCLC have a five-year survival rate of 75-92 percent.

People with stage 1B non-small cell lung cancer have a five-year survival rate of about 68 percent.

Stage 2

NSCLC patients have a five-year survival rate of approximately 60%.

People with stage 2B NSCLC have a five-year survival rate of about 53%.

Stage 3

People with stage 3A NSCLC had a 36 percent five-year survival rate.

People with stage 3B NSCLC had a 26 percent five-year survival rate.

People with stage 3C NSCLC have a five-year survival rate of around 13%.

Stage 4

People with stage 4A NSCLC have a five-year survival rate of roughly 10% because the cancer is generally difficult to cure once it has spread to other regions of the body.

People with stage 4B NSCLC have a five-year survival rate of fewer than 1%.